Trump First 100 Days: President rips "ridiculous standard" for measuring early performance

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

The first 100 days of a presidency generally serve as a barometer for what a new administration will be able to accomplish during its term. Full of energy and fresh off the campaign trail, a newly inaugurated president will generally try to implement as many of the policies that helped them get elected as possible.

But in a Friday morning tweet, President Donald Trump called the standard for measuring performance in the first 100 days a "ridiculous" metric by which to judge the capabilities of a new White House.

"No matter how much I accomplish during the ridiculous standard of the first 100 days, & it has been a lot (including S.C.), media will kill!" he wrote.

Trump's pre-emptive anxiety likely stems from the fact that 91 days into his own presidency, few of his agenda items have actually come to pass.

His plans to immediately repeal and replace former President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act stalled when members of the conservative Freedom Caucus refused to vote for the Trump-backed replacement bill, the American Health Care Act.

A proposed travel ban on seven majority-Muslim countries also sputtered and died in February, when the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled the administration could not provide sufficient evidence that national security interests warranted the ban.

While Trump's first 100 days have not been without victory, those successes have been measured and may not be enough to stave off criticisms about his administration's accomplishments.

True to his campaign promises, Trump was able to nominate and lock in Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, and also made good on his vow to pull the United States out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. While Trump's detractors are likely already preparing screeds against his short tenure, signs suggest that his administration isn't ready to throw in the towel just yet.

A Thursday report from Politico claimed Trump and House conservatives were rallying to prepare a second piece of health care legislation they planned to rush to a vote next week, just shy of the 100-day mark.

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Brianna Provenzano

Brianna is a staff writer at Mic, covering breaking news. Send tips/inquiries to brianna@mic.com.

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